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the united nations vote whether to recognize the palestinian state. recognizing a palestinian state but the united states, israel and others are not celebrating. we will get the details ahead. the senate is working to change the law. the law that lets cops and the feds read our e-mails. they can just read them if the messages are more than six months old. a change coming that could affect all privacy. i am still on air today because my staff didn't win the record $588 million powerball jackpot. the deal was, if they won, obviously they were thought coming to work and the stage manager was going to anchor and i was going to hang out on their boat. but, no, there are two winners, obviously we hate them. we will talk about them unless breaking news changes everything. this is "studio b." >> first from fox at 3:00, the united nations general assembly hold a historic vote any moment on recognizing an independent palestinian state. it is expected to pass overwhelmingly despite opposition from the united states and israel which are in a vast majority of the u.n.'s 193 members. this measure
on the heels of a successful palestinian bid at the united nations to gain nonmember observer state status. secretary of state hillary clinton calling the move a setback. >> let me reiterate that this administration, like previous administrations, has been very clear with israel, that these activities that back the cause of a negotiated peace. we all need to work together to find a path forward in negotiations that can finally deliver on a two-state solution. that must remain our goal. >> kelly: so what does it mean for the stalled israeli-palestinian peace talks, john bolton weighs in just ahead. >> jamie: also, a top al-qaeda terrorist is now in custody. big news, we'll tell you where he was captured and why his arrest is so significant. >> kelly: plus, breaking news out of sear yeah, the country's internet service is back on as fighting begins between troops and rebels. we're live in the the middle east. >> jamie: and also, a defiant move out of north korea. the rogue nation's latest plan to launch yet another long range rocket. [ abdul-rashid ] i've been working since i was about 16. y
waving because of an impending decision at the united nations. i'll ask israel's ambassador to the united states why he thinks -- why his country thinks the u.n.'s possibly interaction is a bad idea. i'm wolf blitzer. you're in "the situation room." >>> we begin with today's hard words in the negotiations to avoid the so-called fiscal cliff. that steep across the board spending cut and tax increase scheduled to hit in just 33 days. in a scathing assessment today, the speaker of the house john boehner says there's been no substantive progress on a deal. need to realize there can be no deal without tax rates going up for top earners. let's go live to our chief white house correspondent jessica yellin. she's got more on the latest developments. tough talk from both sides, jessica. >> reporter: tough talk and some bright lines, wolf. on the same day that treasury secretary tim geithner went to capitol hill to meet with both democrats and republicans to talk about these negotiations, there is tense body language and tough words on both sides of pennsylvania avenue. they're starting to sound du
will not support the latest palestinian bid to become an observer state in the united nations. a government spokesman said berlin was talking to other european states to find a common position. the palestinian authority president is in the united states where he met the u.s. assistant secretary of state. the u.s. says it will vote against upgrading the palestinians from an observer entity to an observer state in the united nations. >> in syria, 34 people have been reported killed in a double car bombing in. reports indicate a suicide bomber blew up his vehicle shortly after a bomb went off. the attacks targeted a town loyal to president assad's government. meanwhile, an unconfirmed report says rebels in aleppo in the north shot down a fighter jet and captured its pilot. egypt pose a political crisis is deepening. clashes erupted in cairo between police and protesters who have been occupying central tahrir square. >> they about to stay put until president morsi withdraws from power. >> he insists that his decree is necessary for national security and is only temporary. >> police used tear ga
by the united nations general assembly. an overwhelming majority made palestine a non-member state. that is the same as the vatican. >> only a handful of countries voted against the move, including the u.s. and israel. both threaten to sanction palestinian request. israel today announced the construction of 3000 more settler homes in response. >> many hope it will be for step toward independence and true statehood. >> life remains the same in the palestinian territories, but many say the united nations vote has given them a new outlook. >> it is a beautiful feeling. there's hope that our children will grow up in an independent nation with its own voice, and that is a feeling that is hard to describe it. >> the decision came after a powerful appeal by the palestinian authority president in new york. >> the general assembly is called upon today to issue a birth certificate of the reality of the state of palestine. >> 138 generally assembly -- general assembly members voted in favor of upgrading palestine to the status of nonmember observers say. israel opposed the status change, sayi
to the united nations for the landmark vote. should palestinians get statehood? how would that work? what could it mean for peace in the middle east? and the biggest names in all of baseball on the ballot for the hall of fame including three players suspected of having used performance enhancing drugs. what to do in the time of sports, what to do with steroids? that is all ahead unless breaking news changes everything. >> first from fox at 3:00 in new york city the fight over the so-called fiscal cliff has gone from negotiations to playing out in public. today the president laid out the plan to step the looming tax hike in a public push that seemed like a campaign event. president obama meeting with a group of what he described as middle class americans, and repeated the argument for raising taxes on families earning more than $250,000, a plan which republicans so far reject. the president said the re-election shows a majority of americans support his approach. >> not just democrats but also a lot of republicans and a lot of independents agreed we should have a balanced approach to deficit redu
. this is "studio b." it is the bottom the hour. time for the top of the news. the united nations secretary-general said today that syria's 20 month long civil war has reached new and appalling heights of brow -- brutality. both sighteds have stepped up attacks in more than -- with more than four million in need of humanitarian aid. syrian jets bombed rebel targets near the damascus airport as major middle east airlines continue to suspend flights into the syrian capital. the interpret is down for a second day. the syrian government blames "terrorists." the activists say syrian civil war led to the deaths of more than 40,000. and now live to conor. this is getting serious and it is reportedly the biggest communications outage since it began. >>reporter: yes. that is right. according to international analysts they say 90 90 percentf the internet connections are down in syria. it is overwhelmingly likely that it was the assad regime that cut the communication devices. there are a couple of possibilities. some analysts say it is possible the regime will launch a large scale military offensive.
minute history expected to be made at the united nations. palestinians on the verge of gaining a new status at the u.n. but the u.s. isn't so happy about this one. we'll take you there live next. ♪ ♪ ...could end with adding a close friend. ♪ the lexus december to remember sales event is on, offering some of our best values of the year. this is the pursuit of perfection. >>> u. (voting at this hour on whether to make palestine a nonmember observer state. just a latest chapter in the effort to become a status. >> reporter: the final rally before heading to new york. palestinian president abbas addressing supporters in ramallah. the final decision to head to the united nations tomorrow he says to enhance the position of palestine to an observer state in the united nations and it is the first step to achieve all our national palestinian rights. if the palestinians win a majority in the u.n. general assembly the u.n. will recognize palestine as a nonmember observer state like the vatican, the territory to include the west bank, gaza and east jerusalem. >> for the world to begin to
: the united nations general assembly voted overwhelming to recognize the palestinian authority as a non-member state. some say the vote could put even more obstacles between israel and the p.a. and hinder further peace talks. here is chris mitchell from jerusalem. >> reporter: the historic vote passed overwhelming, 138 in favor, and 48 abtentions and nine against. they said they would accept nothing less than an independent state with east jerusalem as its capital. >> this time we're determined to go. nothing is going to shake us. the train has left the station. there is no way we be can deterred. we can be frightened, we can be pushed around -- i think this determination has become greater now. >> reporter: palestinians in the west bank celebrated the vote. and palestinians also celebrated in hamas-controlled gaza. >> it is a wonderful feeling, it is amazing. god willing, unity fatah and hamas will happen very soon in the near future. we will be brothers, and together we will destroy the israeli entity. god willing, we are going to victory, victory, victory. >> reporter: the vote was l
at the united nations. >> warner: wonder why your bills are going up? paul solman examines "the fine print" with author and journalist david cay johnston. >> i'm not against corporations. i am in favor of rules that make you earn your profits in the competitive market. you don't get them through a government rule that lets the company reach in your wallet and take money. the kinds of profits that we're >> brown: after the election, what's next for immigration reform? ray suarez asks texas senator kay bailey hutchison and illinois representative luis gutierrez. >> warner: and on the "daily download," we look at how the obama administration is re-using digital information gathered for the campaign to rally support now. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: washington was a-whirl today with m
at the united nations to upgrade the palestinian authority status to nonmember observer state, full statehood still may be an allusive dream. with me to talk about his people's hopes and difficulties is palestinian prime minister salam fayyad. he's in washington to attend the 2012 saban forum on u.s./israel relations. it's my understanding you were against this at first. is that true? and if so, how do you feel now? >> no. i never was against it. as a matter of fact, i was very much a part of the thinking -- >> did you think it was time now? or some time down in the future? >> given the frustrations that we palestinians have had with the political process, it has not been productive. there's no question that we needed to pursue any and all available options to us. and the international law -- with the national diplomacy. and this was one of them. the question for me all along was how best to do it. provide us with some leverage going forward because what we really want end of day is genuine state where our people can live as free people with dignity. >> at the end we were just talking in the
nations would be able to tell people in the united states how to deal with his daughter isabella and some republicans were citing that as a reason for rejecting the treaty. what do you say in. >> i have great respect for both rick and his wife and their daughter and family, he's a strong family man. he either simply hasn't read the treaty or doesn't understand it, or he was just not factual in what he said. because the united nations has absolutely zero -- i mean, zero ability to order or to tell or to even -- i mean, they can suggest, but they have no legal capacity to tell the united states to do anything under this treaty. nothing. there is no ability to go to court. there is not one requirement of a change in american law. and there is no way to tell an american parent anything. now, that is according to our supreme court of the united states. that's according to the language in the treaty itself. and this is a treaty that was negotiated by republican president george herbert walker bush. it was signed by george walker bush at the u.n., and republican attorney general richard thornbur
's health in numbers. unitedhealthcare. >>> the democratic republic of congo is a nation the size of western europe. it may be in for violent regime change, rebels called m 23 have gained ground in recent weeks. congo was the setting for joseph conrad's "heart of darkness." that darkness hasn't lifted in 110 years since the story was published. in the last 14 years alone, 5.4 million died in congo as a result of conflict and humanitarian crisis. jeff, why is it that the crisis seems to be heating up? you point out that the congo that the government's army is losing battle after battle. being routed in battle after battle by the rebels. >> i think this is really an issue of state failure. i've been covering congo for six years and i've seen the country get weaker and weaker since i began. there was a big election in 2006 that created a lot of hope and enthusiasm that things were turning around. they haven't. since then, the government has become more authoritarian, more corrupt, more rebel groups. what we are seeing is a symptom and cause. it's a symptom of this weak state that can't control
their united nations status elevated. what does that mean? does it really do anything for them? basically, it's part of the palestinian effort, going on for decades now, to be an official country. equal in status with israel, and the united states. and anybody else belonging to the u.n. just for some context here, though, the plo has been a permanent observer. that's been their status since 1974. and that has given palestinians the right to speak out and be heard at the assembly. but it doesn't give them a right to vote. richard roth, who covers the u.n. extensively and is our cnn favorite on this topic, is there to really give a little more context as to what they wanted to and what kind of status it would give them and how far up in status it would actually elevate them. richard, tell us what it means. >> okay. first, just to clarify, hamas not really here with the palestinians. the palestinian president abbas is in new york, met with the secretary general last night. yes, this is, as usual with the u.n., words matter. sometimes one letter in a document could be a time bomb. what we have he
diplomatic mission of her career so far. but the u.s. ambassador to the united nations' attempt to reach agreement with republican senators today failed. rice is a favorite of the president's to be nominated as secretary of state to replace hillary clinton. if he does nominate race, she would have to be approved by the senate. margaret brennan is covering for us tonight. margaret? >> reporter: good evening, scott. ambassador rice asked for the meetings on capitol hill today in hopes of patching up differences she has with at least three republicans. the senators have vowed to stop a nomination of rice because of comments she made after the attack on the u.s. consulate in libya. today for the first time she acknowledged her comments were wrong. ambassador race met her toughest critics behind closed doors to explain why she called the september attack on the consulate a spontaneous demonstration when u.s. intelligence suspected it was actually a terrorist assault. after the meeting, republican senators john mccain and lindsey graham had this reaction. >> we are significantly troubled by ma
, cbs news, cairo. >> today the united nations is expected to vote to recognize palestine as a sovereign state. the vote to give the palestinians a non-member observer status is opposed by the united states and israel. >> reporter: good morning. that vote will take place in the general assembly where there will be only observer status. to become a member you need u.n. security council and that won't happen because the u.s. will veto it. the u.s. and israel tried hard to get palestine not to go along with today's vote. but they are now down playing it it doesn't give palestine what it wants. it's quiet this morning outside the u.n. but demonstrators are expected to protest the vote on palestinian recognition. palestinians are seeking status as a nonmember observer. palestinians say they need u.n. recognition of a palestinian state in the west bank in order to get israel back to the negotiating table. the u.s. insists on direct negotiations with israel. >> the path to a two state solution is through jerusalem and ramallah, not new york. >> reporter: they recognized the palestine 1977 borde
to the successful palestinian bid for nonmember observer status at the united nations. israel now withholding $100 million in tax revenue from the palestinians. this after israel announced new settlements in the west bank and east jerusalem. aapparently in response to the u.n. general assembly win by the palestinians last thursday. joining us now as he does every sunday at this time, former united states ambassador to the u.n. john bolton. also a fox news contributor. good morning, ambassador. >> guest: good morning, eric. glad to be with you. >> eric: as always. of course. the u.n. vote, does it really instead make peace more difficult and compromise more complicated in that region? >> guest: absolutely. this vote was fundamentally illegitimate. there is no palestinian state. there is nothing that meets the custnary international law definition. the palestinian authority violated the oslo accord trying to change the status of the west bank and gaza through a means other than negotiation. i have to say it was a vote that could have been won by the united states and israel. but that, leave it for a
the palestinians prejudged everything by going to the united nations and getting them effectively declared as a state. in the same way they say the israeli government is now doing the same thing, taking the land and effectively removing it from the peace negotiations with the palestinians. it's a very sensitive political move, very controversial. the one that israelis say they will go ahead with and build these homes. of course it will take several years. >> martin, the overwhelming vote in the united nations to change the wording, if you will, of the palestine as being an entity observer rather to an observer state, i mean with all of the dialogue and the hopes about building two states living side by side, how much does that wording make a difference? and what's the reaction been there? >> well you know, as you suggest the wording is so slight, the difference is so slight certainly it's mostly symbolic. there's no doubt that until the palestinians get their own state, any phrasing in the united nations is symbolic. it does give a real practical relationship between the palestinians and t
the question of the chemical weapons. >> now, the fighting in syria has gotten so bad that the united nations announced today it is withdrawing all of its nonessential personnel. about 25 of the remaining 100 u.n. staff who are still in the country expected to be out by week's end, shep. >> shepard: james rosen at the state department. north korea is at it again. set to launch a wrong rage rocket within days, second of the year. that's the word from the north korean government. in fact, crews crews have repory moved part of that rocket to a launch pad. u.s. investigators say the creeive regime is likely using launches as a sort of cover for testing missiles that can actually hit the united states. a launch last april was a real dud. the rocket broke apart and pell into the ocean shortly after liftoff. now other nations, including near china and russia are urging the north koreans don't follow through with another launch. saying this would violate united nations security council restrictions. well, it's now early morning in egypt and the nation is bracing for a day of potentially enormous demo
wounded in two days of violence. jonathan hunt is live today at the united nations. the big question is, will president assad stay and fight? will he seek asylum? >>jonathan: the turks and russians, they are saying they are working on what they call "new ideas to bring an end to the ongoing 20--month-old civil war." they have nut given any ideas or details what those ideas might be but it will revolve around whether president assad has decided he going to live and die in syria and die most likely at the hands of the rebels or whether he can be persuaded to say asylum but that has the u.n. secretary-general having misgivings giving a man who has murdered 40,000 of his own people to give him retirement in a safe and friendly country. >> the united nations must not allow any impunity after gross violation of human rights. he must be held accountable and brought to justice>>jonathan: tf the argument is that any kind of solution that would persuade assad to stand down and end the slaughter of all of those syrian civilians might, actually, be worth considering. >>trace: what do we know of the
at the united nations. the world defies the u.s. in a historic vote for palestinians. and huge crowds are gathering in tahrir square after egypt approved a controversial new draft constitution. it's a move that's likely to inflame the political crisis there. we're live in cairo with what it all means for the region. first, a look ahead at the president's schedule. he is in pennsylvania at the toy factory talking fiscal cliff. you're watching "the daily rundown" only on msnbc. [ emily jo ] derrell comes into starbucks with his wife, danielle, almost every weekend. derrell hasn't been able to visit his mom back east in a long time. [ shirley ] things are sometimes a little tight around the house. i wasn't able to go to the wedding. [ emily jo ] since derrell couldn't get home, we decided to bring home to him and then just gave him a little bit of help finding his way. ♪ [ laughs ] [ applause ] i love you. i love you, too. side by side so you get the same coverage, often for less. that's one smart board. what else does it do, reverse gravity? [ laughs ] [ laughs ] [ whooshing ] tell me
it. >>> want to head to the united nations now something you consider one heck of a historic vote. take a look. >> the voting has been completed. please lock the machine. >> that is what it looks like when there's official approval to upgrade a member like this member, the palestinian authority, at the united nations. so, the palestinian authority now has a non-member observer status state. so, that is the same status held by the vatican, but it is not the same status that the united states enjoys. it is still a rung away from that. so, what exactly does it mean? just how good is it? is it symbolic? is it political? let's bring in our senior u.n. correspondent richard ross. this is an overwhelmingly vote and the united states voted against from elevating the palestinian authority and the state of palestine to this status, without question the united states is in the minority here. why? >> well, because the u.s. believes and has consistently believed for decades that only direct peace talks between israel and the palestinians can achieve a long lasting settlement. not through inter
intensifies, making the refugee situation even worse. according to the united nations, more than 100,000 have fled into lebanon. and thousands more are on the waiting list. the war has put huge strains on neighboring countries, leading many struggling. -- leaving many families struggling. and >> the northern border of lebanon with syria, this is where thousands of refugees have escaped in august to years to escape serious moral and war -- syria's pergo civil war. -- berchtold civil war. this family had fled here because it's other boy, 3-year- old mohammed, had been abducted by pro-government militia and was presumed dead. now he has had to move on. the baby is older and stronger, but the family was forced to leave the school because of tensions because -- between local lebanese and the refugees. >> we left because of all the trouble there. sometimes i did not feel safe to be in a room. we may have been better off in syria. >> now in a different village, he is still not settled. he often goes back across the border to help the rebels inside syria. on one trip he shot this dramatic footage of
u.s. ambassador to the united nation, john bolten, judith mill eric and ed qlien. we begin with the closed door briefs on benghazi that lawmakers say raises more questions than ever that the obama administration insisted the attack was the response of a demonstration prompted by rage over an anti-islam video. fox news correspondent with the latest on what lawmakers saw and heard today from the country's top intelligence officials. >> the closed classified briefing brought together seen your state department, intelligence, and counterterrorism officials for a report on the three-month old investigation into the benghazi terrorist attacks. >> to the degree there was planning involved, something done over days, weeks, or over hours? no indication of long term planning here. >> the attacks cronology was laid oillet in a multimedia presentation with drone surveillance and video from the consulate of the cia and annex. >> this is supposed to be sovereign u.s. territory, and if people walk in on us like that without resistance really makes your blood boil because you think to your
one month later, so is this any time for the united nations to be using them as a fund raising tool? the cavuto gang is all over that one at the bottom of the hour. up here first, forget fees in the health care law, and the fees to implement it. how much are you on the hook? tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 let's talk about low-cost investing. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 at schwab, we're committed to offering you tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 low-cost investment options-- tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 like our exchange traded funds, or etfs tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 which now have the lowest tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 operating expenses tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 in their respective tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 lipper categories. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 lower than spdr tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 and even lower than vanguard. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 that means with schwab, tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 your portfolio has tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 a better chance to grow. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 and you can trade all our etfs online, tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 commission-free, from your schwab account. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 tdd#: 1-800-345
. >>> at the united nations, the general assembly approved the resolution that calls on israel to open its nuclear facilities for inspection. the resolution calls on israel to join the nuclear nonprolivelation treaty. it's widely believed israel has a nuclear arsenal, but the israelis have never confirmed or denied they had nuclear weapons. >>> the u.s. is considering military options if syria uses chemical or biological weapons against opponents of the assad regime. u.s. intelligence has detected signs the syrian regime has begun preparing chemical weapons for possible use. it's believed syria has chemical and biological weapons stored at some two dozen sites. speaking in washington yesterday, president obama issued a pointed warning to president bashar assad. >> the world is watching. the use of chemical weapons is and would be totally unacceptable. and if you make the tragic mistake of using these weapons, there will be consequences and you will be held accountable. >> the assad regime won't admit it has chemical weapons, but says if it did, it would not use them. >>> in egypt today, opponents
that the instrument that we are funding that we founded the united nations is giving the palestinian government what was you know able to win on the battlefield. the bigger issue is not just palestinian politicians and terrorists field emboldened but the iranian regime feels emboldened and that really is the player here. it's iran that supports hezbollah to the north but also hamas supplying it with funds, with training, with weapons. we're not doing anything either in washington or new york to really push back on that. >> gregg: clinton has not been getting a lot of criticism. i wonder about that. she has talked so much how many miles she has logged in countries she has visited. is that state craft? >> it's exact opposite. its photo op foreign policy rather than deal with political factors on the ground which is really what state craft is all about. it's been very important people going to very important meetings around the world and this is not just true on israel-palestinian, it's on iran, it's climate change and all these other crisis. it's a lot of photo op stuff and no real changing of factors
iphone or android smartphone. one more way quicken loans is engineered to amaze. ♪ >>> the united nations the p palestinian authority was greated nonmember observer status. what's the only other entity with that status? stay tuned and we'll tell you the correct answer. go do cnn.com/fareed. you can follow us on twitter and facebook. go to itunes.com/fareed for our podcast. you can get a audio version for free or buy the book version. he inverted the idea what would make a system or country or individual anti-fragile. if you go to our conversation in the last segment you can tell this will is a fascinating book. for the last look. political sign professor likes to point out that in democratic nations highways are full of twilights and turns to accommodate people. in autocratic they are straight because leaders can bulldoze whatever is in the way to get to a straight line. take a look at this interesting twist. the builders of this highway in china built their road in a straight line but as you can see the road has a house right in the middle of it. the homeowner refused to budge so they bu
nations envoy. the united states doesn't have a presidential envoy to deal with this crisis. these are low-cost solutions. having that kind of international peace process that brings pressure to bear on the parties, rwanda supporting the rebels, uganda supporting the process, the government is creating problems in the east as well. they need to be preshed into looking at the root causes since this cycle of violence began. >> is there anything that people can link sometimes, you have people who are suffering, wars taking place in that area. >> yeah. thanks for asking for that because the link between all of us who buy these products, like laptops and cell phones, and the violence is congo is very direct. it's sourced from the congo. so a major international effort has -- is under way just like the blood diamonds movement a decade and a half ago for sierra leonne and trying to drive that international market, that supply chain to be a more peaceful and legally developed. so that's really the objective. join up in some of those international efforts, go on raisehopeforco raisehopeforco raiseh
despite the lobbying efforts from the united nations? >> i think most countries unlike the u.s. had a deep misunderstanding as so what the vote was about. many countries, countries of good will, not those with a history against israel and would like to see the country disappear. countries especially in europe thought they were voting for something that would promote peace. they actually thought that by abstaining or supporting this vote, this would promote the idea of a two-state solution. the reason that they made a mistake is that in doing so, they were essentially privileging one aspect of the conflict which is statehood. over other important aspects that were not part of the resolution. and that's why ambassador rice mentioned it was counterproductive. essentially, the palestinians got an easy way to feel good which is nice and important. but without forcing them to actually take the difficult decisions that would truly lead to statehood at the end of the day. >> but let me ask a question. and that is, you know, the palestinian authority which was sort of almost a secondary player duri
's because while opposed to her from her position as ambassador of the united nations and nothing could change my mind on that. bill: based on that answer it appears you are willing to take that answer higher than susan rice with it comes to benghazi. >> this will go down as the biggest coverup in history. they all knew it. they are hoping to have it go beyond the election date which it did. but people are not going to forget it. the administration deliberately covered this and misrepresented what happened in benghazi threatened up in the both of four people. one of whom was a good friend of mine, ambassador stevens. bill: the biggest coverup in american history. >> yes, sir. bill: when senator lieberman came out yesterday afternoon --'s listed as an independent. but he seemed to take more of a sill sill tory tone towards he -- he seemed to take more a conciliatory tone towards sue and rice. you wonder if this is a republican versus democrat issue. if that's the case, you are in the minority. >> that's true. senator lieberman is neither republican nor democrat but he's on the democrat s
won a historic vote at the united nations, it's a vote that raises their status and could be a possible step forward official state hood. now rarely says it may be ready to build thousands of new housing units in territories they occupy. earlier i spoke with israel's deputy ministry of foreign affa affairs, i asked him why now? >> our buildings, not only from our right, as it is international but it is our homeland, but also a force for strategy teakics and security interests. we're talking about a country that's nine miles wide, this occupies less than one-third of the middle east. i think it is a right to make sure that we have secured and defensible borders, especially in light of all of the animosity and the hatred that the palestinians and other extremists say in the islamic world are throwing at us. but, let me tell you one thing, deborah, is israel has always been ready for a compromise for peace, for concessions and wherever we build, it's in areas that for certain will stay in any future agreement within israeli territories. >> when you call this strategic, effect
at the united nations this afternoon. it seems there is a battle for a capital city that could be shaping up and that is crucially important. >>jonathan: yes. there is no doubt we have entered a new and very significant stage in the battle for syria and that is in essence of battle for the capital of damascus which has been going on for five or six days. president bashar al-assad wants do and indeed has to hang on to the capital if he is to stay in power. there are many experts who believe either way, he has decided to fight to the death. either if he tries to flow he will be killed by his own supporters who will feel betrayed him him or ultimately he will be killed by the rebels. this, while it does seem to be the end days for the bashar al-assad regime, it could yet stretch on for some days or even weeks. that because the rebels simply are not strong enough to defeat the syrian security forces in one battle. what we are seeing is an intense battle of attrition. most experts will tell you, his days are numbered. >> the big question on the international stage now, jonathan, will he use the c
-assad in syria may resort to using chemical weapons on his own people. in the meantime, the united nations is hint thag there wil hinting that there will be no asylum for bashar al-assad as the syrian dictator makes it clear that he will die before leaving the country under any circumstances. what is going on behind the scenes, for that we turn to corn powell following all the latest developments from our mideast bureau in jerusalem. connor. >> reporter: the international and internal pressure is mounting on bashar al-assad today. secretary clinton reiterated her comments that the use of chemical weapons is a red line for the united states and that there would be consequences. we are also hearing that bashar al-assad is beginning to look for asylum around the world. he is reaching out to world leaders in latin america, particularly cuba, ecuador and venezuela. not on the list of places is russia and iran his two biggest military backers. this is all coming as the internal pressure on the bashar al-assad regime seems to b to be mounting. rebel fighter are moving closer and closer to damascu
. >>> israel is facing a setback at the united nations as france is announcing it plans to vote for palestinian statehood. the u.n. general assembly set to vote on this day after tomorrow on whether to recognize a palestinian state. france is the first major european country to announce it will support the resolution and analysts say the measure is likely to pass. israel and the united states said the only true path to statehood would involve a peace agreement with israel. this week's vote will also happen against the backdrop of a fragile cease fire between the israelis and their forces and the militants from hamas. >>> workers cracked open the grave today of the late palestinian leader yasser arafat. it's all part of an investigation into whether somebody poisoned him. assassinated him even. he died in 2004. what killed him is still officially a mystery. israel has denied poisoning him at all. but over the summer, a lab in switzerland detected traces of a radioactive material in stains on his clothing. the current palestinian leader authorized this investigation to determine once and for all
to close well above 13,021. the nasdaq rose 20 points to close at 3,012. the united nations general assembly voted today to recognize palestine as a non- member observer state. the tally was 138 to nine, with 41 abstentions. the u.s. voted no. it came after palestinian president mahmoud abbas appealed to the world body to issue the birth certificate of palestine. >> we did not come here seeking to delegitimize a state established years ago, and that is israel. rather, we came to affirm the legitimacy of a state that must now achieve its independence, and this is palestine. >> sreenivasan: palestinians said the vote would strengthen their hand in future peace talks with israel. but the israeli ambassador to the u.n., ron prosor, warned that the palestinians are turning their backs on peace. >> for as long as president abbas prefers symbolism over reality, as long as he prefers to travel to new york for u.n. resolutions rather than travel to jerusalem for genuine dialogue, any hope of peace will be out of reach. >> sreenivasan: meanwhile, a bipartisan group of u.s. senators said today
unsatisfactory in the answers that i do think now she faces close to the united nations republican opposition. >> you have other stories coming out about the companies that invested in. the point is, is this an issue for would? is the president going to put her forward? >> she was protected of her in the episode. but i think john kerry has been the leading candidate all along. but some people at the table think john kerry has negative bus i think he is the leading candidate. the other big ticket item here is the treasury secretary. you can see geithner leaving. and there is talk of erskine bowles or charles djo lew. >> they lost colin, the mild mannered senator in congress and the senator that introduced rice when she was nominated to be the u.n. ambassador, when you lose collins you have lost the world. i don't understand how she went around with meetings to present her best side to the mccain and graham. to collins, ayotte and came out on the -- i'm talking about susan rice. she came out on the wrong end of this. and for some reason. i think her nomination is in deep trouble. the president
an historic vote at the united nations. my guess says it's a game changer. i'll talk to the first woman elected to the palestinian legislative council. shopping for medicare coverage? don't wait. open enrollment ends december 7th. now's the time to take action. call unitedhealthcare today. celebrations after palestinians win a vote at the united nations. it's a vote that gives them a state up grade and is being seen as a possible step towards official statehood. it had been planned before eight days of fighting erupted in gaza. 138 countries voted yes. 41 abstained. only nine voted against the status change. leaving the no votes for israel and the united states. here's palestinian authority president mahmoud abbas at the united nations. >> we did not come here seeking to delegitimize a state established years ago. and that is israel. rather, we came to affirm the legitimacy of a state that must now achieve its independence, and that's palestine. >> we're joined from ramallah in the west bank. what does this u.n. vote mean? some thought it was symbolic, but it seemed to me much more than
and the united nations. prime minister, thanks, as usual, for joining us. >> thank you, wolf. >> good to see you the other day in jerusalem. let's talk about what's happening in the middle east right now. the u.s., the obama administration, nato now obviously very concerned about the regime of president assad potentially using chemical weapons, poison gas against its own people. here's the question, what is the difference killing civilians in syria with bombs from jet fighters or attack helicopters as opposed to using say poison gas or chemical warfare? >> that's a good question. in one sense in moral terms, there is no difference and almost 40,000 people have died in syria already. but i think the use of chemical weapons and poison gas, i think the fatalities would be very much greater. and it does cross a line. these aren't judgments that you can make in any scientific way. but i think what your administration, the international community is signaling to president assad, if you cross that line, there will be a strong reaction. >> those are tough words coming from president obama, from secretar
's your policy? >>> developing right now, we are about 45 minutes away from a united nations general assembly session that will result in a historic vote on palestinian statehood. there have already been rallies today in the palestinian territories in support of a resolution upgrading the palestinian's u.n. status to a nonmember state. the resolution is expected to win overwhelming approval in the general assembly despite strong opposition by the u.s. and israel. here's israeli prime minister benjamin netanyahu earlier today. >> the palestinians must recognize the jewish state. and they must be prepared to end the conflict with israel once and for all. none of these vital interests, these vital interests of peace, none of them appear in the resolution that will be put forward before the general assembly today. and that is why israel cannot accept it. >> joining me now to talk more about this, former state department mideast officer joel ruben. also palestinian italian journalist and msnbc contributor willa jabroe. both israel and the u.s. say the resolution violates agreements to sol
to the united nations. this time from two moderate republican senators, susan collins and bob corker. both considered integral to rice's chances of becoming secretary of state if, in fact, she is nominated by the president. senator collins was the more critical of the two. she took the ambassador to task for using intelligence talking points in the aftermath of the attack in benghazi. >> i still have many questions that remain unanswered. i continue to be troubled by the fact that the u.n. ambassador decided to play what was essentially a political role at the height of the contentious presidential election campaign by agreeing to go on the sunday shows to present the administration's position. >> senator corker declined to give deep details of the meeting but instead delivered a hit directed at the whole of washington. >> the whole issue of benghazi has been to me a tawdry affair. everything about it. i have found no heroes here in washington. >> and for the second day in a row press secretary carny defended the president's ambassador to the u.n. >> my view on this is the same as it was y
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